Configure Messaging and Collaboration (70-282 exam)

Howdy folks – Harryb here and I am the publisher of the Microsoft Small Business Specialist book. I post up pssages to help you pass the Microsoft 70-282 exam so that you can become a Small Buiness Specialist (SBSC). This exam and the topic below are specific to Windows Small Buisness Server 2003 (SBS). But I think it’s safe to safe that many of us still run Small Business Server 2003, even though Small Business Server 2008 is still out on the market! (FYI – here is a great blog on Small Business Server SBS 2008 messaging and collaboration as an adjunct to this topic)

Configure Messaging and Collaboration

There is an old saying in the SBS community: You already know more about Exchange Server 2003 than you think you do. How can this be? Exchange Server 2003 is essentially installed and configured for you when you deploy SBS 2003. Its configuration level out of the box will likely meet 90 percent of your needs with the product. End of story.

The remaining 10 percent of Exchange Server 2003 that you “don’t know” out­of-the-box is something you likely don’t really need to know for the 70-282 exam. There are parts of Exchange that really don’t relate to the SBS space, such as site connectors to link multiple Exchange locations together.

Experience counts for something in the worlds of SMB and SBS (thank goodness) and this really manifests itself in Exchange Server 2003. More than other SBS components, there is nothing like Exchange Server 2003 experience to prepare you for the 70-282 exam.

IMPORTANT: Be discerning in the amount of information you are prepared to digest in preparation for the 70-282 exam. Sure, you could do a deep dive into the Exchange Server 2003 internals for the sake of satisfying your own interests. However, that would be INEF­FICIENT from a 70-282 exam preparation time management point of view. Rather, using your very best judgment, ask critically, “Do I really need to know that?” We like data dumps as much as anybody, but find a balance that prevents brain freeze due to overload.

One bona fide Exchange Server 2003 tip that you might not know and need to know relates to the number of Exchange servers and stores allowed on an SBS network. Briefly:

  • Multiple Exchange server machines are allowed on an SBS 2003 net­work, assuming you purchased the extra Exchange product licenses.
  • Only one store is allowed on the Exchange version (standard edition) contained in SBS 2003. With the Exchange enterprise edition, multiple Exchange stores are allowed.

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Here is the final word – another outside refeence – to Small Business Server 2003 messaging and collaboration.

cheers….harrybbbb

Harry Brelsford, CEO at SMB Nation

MBA, MCSE, CNE, CLSE, CNP, MCP, MCT, SBSC (Microsoft Small Business Specialist)

PS – my Small Business Server 2008 (SBS 2008) book is now here! J

PPS – my spring show, SMB Nation Spring 2009, is in the NYC-area on May 1-3, 2009.

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